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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 112 (some duplicates have been removed)
to be in jordan. -- the day that osama bin laden was killed, i happened to be in jordan i saw students out there chanting "usa!" these are young people who were children at the time of the 9/11 attack, most of whom were probably too young to remember those attacks directly as conscious beings. they know it as a part of history. and i don't think that, if we want to be a nation founded on justice, a nation founded on laws, that assassination is a way to do that. this was a huge crime against humanity, what happened on september 11. bringing the perpetrators to justice is a noble goal, a fascinating, the of the perpetrator who is not physically there, but who was inspiring the action is not such a noble thing in my mind. jordanians and palestinians in jordan, many of whom have suffered far more at the hands al qaeda-tech militants even then we have, they were not thrilled at the idea that there was an assassination of this kind because they have seen the consequences of assassination. it is not a question of should somebody be arrested, brought to trial, the be imprisoned for life. absolutel
one is still called today. east jerusalem was then part of jordan, and it contained the jews' holiest sites, including their ancient temple, destroyed by the romans. once the temple was destroyed, all that remained was the western wall. this place is important for the jewish people worldwide. ross: this is what people prayed to ever since the second temple was destroyed, ever since the jewish people were dispersed. narrator: but because they were in jordanian east jerusalem, the site was off limits to jews until 1967. that year, israel defeated threatening arab armies in the six-day war and gained control over more territory. from syria they took the golan heights. from egypt they captured the sinai peninsula and the gaza strip. from jordan they occupied the west bank of the jordan river, including the rest of jerusalem. ross: after the six-day war, after the victory in '67, with the unification of jerusalem, one of the very first things done by a labor-led government was to make it clear that jerusalem would never be divided again. narrator: israel had moved its capital to jerusalem
between israel and jordan. does that come to play with something you said. >> another excellent question. three home run questions from three freshmen. [laughter] the united states is very 0 supportive of efforts in the middle east to try to work out some of the challenges to the production and exporting of energy. and i think you know from having been in israel, israel has made some significant finds of natural gas off the coastline, and there's also the potential for such new energy sources off of cypress, off of lebanon, and we have been urging diplomatically that everybody work out their boundaries, that gets me back to one of the points i was making because there's often overlapping claimant -- -- claims and unless they're resolved stand in the way of the commercial exemployeation of whatever the reserves night be. it's in everyone's interest to try to make sure. everybody know where the boundaries are and people are able to let contracts that will be legally recognized in order to see what potential is available. similarly with respect to the pipeline, as you know, the pipeline fro
. word from initials jordan they foiled an attack by a group related to al-qaeda. apparently a group of 11 militants, a cell watching. they thought there would be an attempt suicide attack at shopping malls and western diplomats. we're working on that but it's coming with a lot of detail from state tv in jordan. they've broken up a group of 11 militants linked to al-qaeda. the plan was to blow up some shopping malls or set off explosions. with that distraction in place, carry out attempted suicide bombings and assassinations of foreign diplomats in the area. as we get this confirmed at fox and get more information, we'll let you know. >>> monday is the final presidential debate before the voters head to the polls. the focus is on foreign affairs. the attack on the u.s. embassy on libya will get a lot of attention. joining us, senator barrasso from wyoming. thank you for making time for us today. >> great to be with you. >> you had strong words weeks ago but what you thought happened in libya and the aftermath. now that we have more information, you've been briefed. what do you think
is in washington with the details. >>> it is to put out here. jordan is a key u.s. ally in the middle east and israel peace partner and has been targeted before. the latest plot was more ambitious in the planning. jordan suspect had weapons aimed at inflicting the heaviest losses possible. the suspects are mill at that points and considered lengths to al-qaida and unclear to how close the militants were to carrying out the attacks. plot included anassinating western diplomats and shopping malls and cafes. and other areas where people from the west gather in aman. militants were arm ready with explosives and mortars and rifles. militants with ties to al-qaida carried out a terror attack and killing the u.s. ambassador and three others there. it was praised by the al-qaida leader who issued a call for more direct action. jordan's department outlined the intricate plot that the suspects planned to set off two decoy explosion before setting off a series of militia attacks and suicide bombers in the final phase they were to attack diplomatic missions . one question that arises from all of this
him is that he was the principal, secret negotiator of the israel/jordan peace treaty, and it's easy to forget that, that role, but it is important to understand how crucial that peace treaty is now as the region is so volatile. there's a bit of good news today, i'm told the new egyptian ambassador to israel came today to announce that israel -- that egypt will abide by the peace treaty, will abide by the peace treaty with israel, but we have relied on the peace treaty, israel has relied on it, and so have we, for many years. as haleh said, we watch developments in the middle east very closely here. the president of yemen came a few weeks ago to speak about a way forward for his country which is trying hard to become a strong ally in the fight against terrorism and has huge economic challenges. we just held the second of three meetings on how women are faring in the arab awakening. last month a former deputy secretary of state and ambassador tom pickering and other senior national security officials, military officers and experts with decades of middle east experience presented a rep
constituents lines today. >> good evening, i'm robert jordan. i'm jackie bange. >> dan ponce is here with tonight's top story. >> the robo call lasts a little more than 80 seconds. congressman jackson asks for pateince and support without directly asking for votes. the call was paid for by his re- election campaign. tonight mixed reaction from his constituents. >> "like many human beings a series of events came together in my life at the same time and they have been difficult to sort through. i am human. i am doing my best. i am trying to sort through them all. >> voters in illinois 2nd hearing his voice for the first time in months. during the robo call, jesse jackson junior didn't give many specifics about his ongoing health problems - but he did express optimism. >> "i am starting to heal. the good news is my health is improving, but my doctors tell me the road to recovery is a long one. >> and he asked for prayers and support from those he>> "for nearly 18 years i have served the people of the second district, i am anxious to return to work on your behalf, but at this time it i
country jordan saying 42 have broken up a terror plot by members of a suspected al-qaeda linked group. they were allegedly planning to attack western diplomats and bomb public areas like shopping malls. at least 11 militants have been arrested. police say the men brought in weapons by nearby syria to carry out their plot and may have been equipped with homemade explosives from iraq. >> gregg: another fox news alert. a shooting near a mall in milwaukee wounding several people. deputies looking for a dangerous gunman on the loose. anna is following with the details. >> reporter: we can tell you, the alleged suspect. it appears authorities are still searching for an active shooter who opened fire around 11:00 today sending four people to a brookfield, wisconsin hospital. they say a woman came out of the spa injured. first responders helped to her an ambulance. ten others ran out in hysteria. >> we saw some woman come out of the front door and roll down the hill. they scooped her up and took her over to the ambulance. then there was another woman and picking her over to the ambulance. the
shot. 20-year-old jordan chit died. police believe these arrests are tied to that shooting. >> through diligent police work, officers and investigators have identified these suspects and articulated probable cause to a magistrate who agreed and they were arrested. >> reporter: investigators say the january shooting was gang- related. they won't say what led them to make the arrests today and what evidence they have. >> this is one of many cases in which our investigators continue to ask the public for help and we continue to make progress in. >> reporter: so the house we were at today was a few blocks away from where that shooting happened on the option of end of san antonio park. the suspects are still being questioned and have not officially been charged. elizabeth? >> thank you, elissa harrington. >>> some more bay area headlines now. police say a domestic fight in san jose ended with a girlfriend pulling out a gun and shooting her boyfriend dead at a house party over the weekend. 26-year-old [ indiscernible ] died at the scene. >>> and 20-year-old anna cohn is under arrest police
$10,000. this on ebay. not just any sauce. mcjordan barbecue sauce from a michael jordan promotion at mcdonald's in the early 1990s. >>> the most important celebrity alive weighs in on the presidential election. you may not understand what she is actually saying, and she has not heard of one of the candidates. "the ridiculoust" is next. based on this chart ? don't rush into it, i'm not looking for the fastest answer. obviously verizon. okay, i have a different chart. going that way, does that make a difference ? look at verizon. it's so much more than the other ones. so what if we just changed the format altogether ? isn't that the exact same thing ? it's pretty clear. still sticking with verizon. verizon. more 4g lte coverage than all other networks combined. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never taking a bailout. there when you need them. helping millions of americans over the centuries. the strength of a global financial leader. the heart of a one-to-one rel
secret negotiator of the israel-jordan peace treaty. it is easy to forget that role. but it is important to understand how crucial that peace treaty is now as the area is so volatile. there's a bit of good news today -- the new egyptian ambassador to israel came today to announce that israel -- that egypt will abide by the peace treaty -- will abide by the peace treaty with israel. but we have relied on the peace treaty, israel has relied on it. and so have we, the peace treaty with jordan, for many years. and efraim halevy deserves enormous credit for that. as haleh said, we watched developments in the middle east very closely here. the president of the yemen came a few weeks ago to speak about a way forward for his country, which is trying hard to become a strong ally in the fight against terrorism, and has huge economic challenges. we just held the second of three meetings on how women are fairing in the arab awakening. last month, former deputy secretary of state and ambassador, tom pickering, and other national security officials, military officers and experts with decades of experi
and jordan river, a state connected by a highly developed infrastructure of roads and water pipelines. i'm not sure when the point of return was passed, seven years ago, my first visit to israel, it was plausible to speak of the palestinian state. now did -- now it does not. a democratic process, appointment of envoys searching for commonground, building on previous agreements like those arrived at under the prime minister don't have chance of success. there's no political majority in israel in favor of withdrawing from the territory and settlements israel would have to do to allow a genuinely economically viable palestinian state. benjamin netanyahu gave lip service to the idea, but people close to him said he would never offer the palestinians something he could accept. the west bank, areas a and b, cut off from the world without control of the air space, their water will not produce a viable state. what can the next president do to change this? the only intervention that could shake israel out of the current spiral would be if a president made clear where the united states sees this h
guests tell us what they thifg will move the markets tomorrow morning. joining me, michael james, jordan kimmel from benjamin securities and kimberly foss of impirian wealth management. michael, kick it off with you. 30 seconds on the clock. what do you look at in terms of moving our money tomorrow? >> thank you, maria. i'm going to pay close attention to texas instruments. i agree with the guest earlier. patrick wang. the number were in line for the quarter. guidance for q 4 was worse than i was looking for. i agree the sentiment is excellent for the stock here. for trade and investors. they've done a good job of lowering the bar. tomorrow morning, coach reports earnings along with harley davidson. those are going to be two excellent reads on consumer discretionary stance going into the numbers. i like it. >> we'll leave it there. jordan, you're up. 30 seconds on the clock. >> thanks. clearly i think the biggest news tonight or tomorrow morning could be the effect of the debate tonight because it's so close. a lot of people are sitting around just waiting, waiting for the election, unfo
wider war, with really serious consequences that for turkey and perhaps for jordan and saudi arabia and because of economic consequences for europe, so i am afraid that the word i tend to emphasize in ts context the prudence, rather than engagement. >> rose:. >> but i think i heard both candidates say they would not put -- it was ditches in terms of what kind of arms they might supply on the one hand communication equipment an on the other hand from -- light to heavy -- >> you can't start supplying weapons with someone without becoming tied to the consequences of that, that kind of detach. from the supply of arms and eventual engagement in the process, especially if the supply of arms creates tetation tospre that w. >> rose: what do you do about arms? >> i think you do have to know who those arms are going to, because it could come back and haunt you, obviously. >> rose: but can you control that? >> well, whether we do it or somebody else does it, you know, it is happening, so. >> rose: the arms are going in, you mean? >> but, you know, i just came back from the region also, mostly
. good morning. welcome to "news 4 today." i'm eun yang. >> and i'm richard jordan sitting in for aaron gilchrist. we're waking up to temperatures in the 50s right now. it's 6:00 straight up. look at that picture. it looks like we're in for another warmup. >> tom kierein is here with the forecast. what's going on? >> did you say it's october? >> that's what the calendar says. >> it doesn't feel like. going to feel more like a late august day. there's capitol hill under a partly cloudy sky. >>> looking at temperatures around the region, we have a milder morning than we've had the last couple of mornings. right now temperatures in the suburbs and rural areas are generally in the mid-40s. yesterday morning we were down near freezing much of the region. right near the potomac, right near the chesapeake bay, most locations mid-60s. away from the waters, eastern shore, many locations in the 40s, shenandoah valley out of the mountains. few sprinkles up in pennsylvania. that's going to stay to our north. storm team 4 hour by hour forecast for today. by 8:00 a.m., we will have still a chill in t
.s. military sent to jordan on syria crisis." mostly this military unit is helping jordan handle the estimated at 180,000 syrian refugees who have crossed the border and are severely straining the country's resources. foreign policy is to be a topic in the debate between vice president joe biden and vice presidential candidate paul ryan. the debate begins at 9:00 p.m. eastern time on thursday, and we will read air the debate after we take your phone calls and -- we will re-air the debate after we take your phone calls and comments. up next, we will talk with frank donna kelley on campaign -- frank donatelli on campaign 2012. julie, this is not the first time that the candidates for that seat will be squaring off. there are two debates under their belts. where do things stand? guest: the first two debates in this race have been pretty it and fall, a pretty nasty the dates. pretty positive up until september. there is the ban on outside grant adds -- on outside ads. until september, there were no negative adds for either candidate as well, but over the last couple of months it has taken a trend
, terrible. i had for dinner one young iraqi -- my niece was outraged at what happened and she went to jordan to help the librarians in the museum. brought over to young iraqis to get a ph.d.. i had one over for dinner and as an air of culture whenever he comes over he brings me a gift. and he puts his hand over his heart. he told me that his sister lost her husband and every single one of her children. she is alone. that was extraordinary. how can you live and lose everyone that you have lost? how can you? is this post-traumatic stress? will you sleep? will you not have nightmares? because we all have memories and we have bad memories and good ones and we can put them away. can you put this memory away? can a soldier put this memory away? no. >> host: in your research marguerite, you write about different organizations and the people who found them like dr. judith broder, the soldiers product -- the soldiers project. explain what that is. >> guest: she is an amazing woman. she is in her 70's. she went to see a play written by a soldier about combat, and she was struck. she was thinking, i've
there was an attack in jordan and one of the targets in that attack was the us embassy. but we know that a large number of the people who are fighters who went he to iraq to fight and kill americans and iraqis were from libya and east of benghazi in that region. do we know, are they living in libya now or did they purposely come to libya? >> it is possible, we don't know. it is possible that they went home and it fits in from what they are hearing. that this was a group of loosely banded people. and they will pick up on that through phone calls and social media conversations and it is possible that they went home and got together and found out september 11th and here is an opportunity for us let's go do it. >> what do you make of the fact that it is libyans with the experience in iraq? >> i had gone to libya and met with ghadafi at the time. it was one of our chief concerns. we were approaching them to say to them. we were concerned about the pipeline. the fear he there, is not only at the time are you allowing the people to travel into the war zone, but you worry about the bleedoff that after t
into jordan and turkey. >>> you remember the five boys produced by the seniors in that family, five boys and he was one of them. he was studying dentistry in london. >> he has a brother maybe mort knows more about ita ruthless character. >> married, lovely wife right? >> yeah but people have given up on him as a quote reformer a long time ago. >> he is not a reformer. >> if there is any goodness left in the man, he has been directed by everybody else. >> if he goes down his people go down. john they go to the wall. they are 12%, sheer shiite, the sunni war? >> a sectarian civil war. >> if it is a civil war we are going to stay out. >> no we didn't stay out of libya. >> i think we are being pulled in. >> you think there is any sentiment in the united states to go into syria? >> not in the united states and i'm against it but we could get pulled in. the whole thing is spreading. the turks are going to be involved. >> the turks are not going to be involved. the president has spoken emfatly about that over there. >> they are involved right now. >> because of the penetration of a body border
and egypt and also the joint projects of energy resources in the middle east between israel and jordan and how that comes to play with everything you said. >> 3 home-run questions from three freshmen. [laughter] the united states is very supportive of efforts in the middle east to try to work out some of the challenges to the production and exporting of energy. and i think you know from having been in his real that israel has made some significant finds of natural gas off its coastline. potential forhe such new energy sources of cyprus, off the lead the non -- off of lebanon and we have been working diplomatically that everyone work out their boundaries. that is one of the points i was making. there's often overlapping claims and those overlapping claims, unless they are resolved, stand in the way of the commercial exploitation of what ever the reserves might be. so it is in everyone's interest to try to make sure that everybody knows where the boundaries are and people are then able to let contracts that legally recognized to see what potential is available. similarly, with respect to
on, this is not a beyonce type event. >> a piece of michael jordan history went for a pretty penny at auction this week. it's barbecue sauce. a 1992 jug of mick jordan sauce sold on ebay for $10,000. the unopened one gallon bottle was the sauce used on the mcjordan burger, a promotion that mcdonald's did 20 years ago in honor of the basketball star. it was a quarter pound beef patty, mustard onion and the the barbecue so you say. >> i remember that from when i was a kid new where was it served? >> at mcdonald's. >> bill: really? >> mcjordan. when michael jordan was playing. i remember because it was the firstburg are i had, it was a circular disk that fit right on top of the burger. >> what are you going to do with this barbecue sauce. >> please don't eat it. >> no word on the shelf life. >> back over your driveway with it but don't eat it. >> the detroit tigers are one win away from the world series. in game three last night the tigers beat the new york yankees 2-1 thanks to justin verlander. he gave up his first run in the ninth inning. they took him out. tigers were last in the
as a capital is a nonstarter. there is now one state between the mediterranean and the jordan river, a state connected by highly-developed infrastructure of roads and water pipelines. i'm not sure when the point of return was passed. of seven years ago on my first visit to israel, it still seemed quite plausible to speak of a palestinian state. now it does not. so i believe any kind of normal diplomatic process -- appointment of a special envoy, searching for common ground, building on previous agreements such as those arrived at under prime minister olmert and prime minister barak -- don't have much chance of success. there's no political majority in israel in favor of withdrawing from the territory ask settlements israel would have to do to allow a genuinely economically-viable palestinian state. prime minister netanyahu, i know, has given lip service to the idea, but people close to him have said he would never offer the palestinians something he could accept. an archipelago stands on the west bank, areas a and b, cut off from the world without control of the air space, their water will n
ties with the sunni alignment of the sunni gulf states, egypt and jordan and the shia group of iran's syria and hezbollah was not easy especially as tension rose between the two groups. this was to be increasingly clear with the onset of the arab spring. when you look initially at russian concerns in the arab spring, it can spread to russia was efforts on the same problems as the arab states, autocratic government, widespread corruption and rising prices and indeed democracy demonstrators were shouting the revolutionary train stopped at the station in cairo, next stop moscow. the second concern, islam is my takeover and in a ending chaos and further inspire the islamists and north caucasus and increasingly and khe sanh as well. number three is oil and gas investments in the middle east could be jeopardized as well as the business and arms sales deals and number four when libya occurred, the russians i think that the major lesson purgative stained on the u.n. security council vote in the no-fly zone in bolivia thereby supporting the arab consensus and continuing the widened russian p
, with the jordanians, jordan and iraq and syria, jordan iraq and turkey all have 100,000 refugees each in their countries at least. we can't do it all ourselves and our wish i could give you an ideal scenario but this isn't one. >> can i ask you? you were talking about it. how did the saudis and others view the possibility of militant extremists coming to the fore in syria. having to fight militant extremists at home and do a good job of it, but what if the money and the arms are going to these people in a disproportionate way. and i was saying at the beginning of the david sanger article, you are going to militant extremists but if you read deeper into the article, it says the intelligence communities are having a difficult time determining who the rebel leaders are and to the rebel factions are. of we don't know who they are how the we know the majority will be militant extremists? if they are -- >> the problem is the militant extremists come to the 4 the more the rebel opposition in general feels abandoned by the west because of failure. because of the weapons they have been promise
such as saudi arabia, uae and jordan, and in 2008 he added libya to the expanding arc of activity. putin's goals were fourfold. number one, demonstrate russia was again a major power in the middle east and the world. number two, gain -- for projects while selling sophisticated products like nuclear reactors and railway systems. number three, as the cost and difficulty of extracting russian oil and natural gas grew to gain joint ventures in oil and natural gas extraction with countries like saudi arabia, iran, uae, libya and iraq. and number four and certainly very important, to prevent the arab states from aiding the islamic resistance movements in the north caucuses that were beginning to spread through the rest of russia. but keeping good ties with the sunni alignment in egypt and jordan and the shia group of hezbollah was not easy, especially as tensions rose between the two groups. this was to be increasingly clear with the onset of the arab spring. now, when you look initially at russian concerns with the arab spring, a, it could spread to russia which suffered some of the same problems as
you, sir. >> may i ask we give mr. jordan his full five minutes? >> be honest -- >> i ask yuan mouse consent the member have 15 seconds. >> objection. mr. chairman, with all due respect. you just allowed mr. burton to go over by two minutes and you're giving mr. -- >> i'm sure it's going to balance tout time. >> we have gone over and i'm going to pull it back into five minutes. >> before we get to your part of the day we will get there. >> without objection, the ranking member is given equal time to ask a question, please. >> i want to go back to you ambassador. i think that was a very critical question. mr. norton talked about the five days. can you explain that to us that during that period, five days or whatever it was, not having the information contrary to what ms. rice may have said. i understand it was based on intelligence. but can you explain how that could happen to the public? in other words, were you all still gathering information, what was going on there, do you know? >> mr. comings, we were gathering information from the intelligence community. we wanted to know what w
publicly saying, i'm a man of the left, in a speech with barbara jordan. >> host: did that hurt him? >> guest: no, because at that time he had stepped down as the anchor manin' 1981. he played mr. objective quite bell, and if you go to a doctor and are getting surgery you don't care if the doctor is a democrat or republican, but when he came out and voiced some disseptember own the vietnam war, it was the beginning of him editorializing, and today we see people in television who are editorializing all the time, and that's a slippery slope we're on now. and also, you see, with cronkite the berth of celebrities and television. where cronkite would go to a rally with senators and people running for president, everybody bum rushed them. they wanted to meet cop cite, not a senator from wisconsin. >> host: how would you describe him as a private person? >> guest: a lot of fun. he could not stand pompous people. at parties he would trunk a lot, sing old time songs, sometimes take part in a strange kind of strip tease act just to get people to crack up. but that's why -- i interviewed so ma
is your testimony. thank you, sir. >> may i ask we give mr. jordan his full five minutes? >> be honest -- >> i ask unanimous consent the member have 15 seconds. >> objection. mr. chairman, with all due respect. you just allowed mr. burton to go over by two minutes and you're giving mr. -- >> i'm sure it's going to balance tout time. >> we have gone over and i'm going to pull it back into five minutes. >> before we get to your part of the day we will get there. >> without objection, the ranking member is given equal time to ask a question, please. >> i want to go back to you ambassador. i think that was a very critical question. mr. norton talked about the five days. can you explain that to us that during that period, five days or whatever it was, not having the information contrary to what ms. rice may have said. i understand it was based on intelligence. but can you explain how that could happen to the public? in other words, were you all still gathering information, what was going on there, do you know? >> mr. comings, we were gathering information from the intelligence community. we
to jordan to help the librarians and the museums, brought over two young iraqi to get a ph.d.. i had one for dinner who i was very fond of. whenever he comes over, he brings me a gift and puts his hand over his heart, and he told me that his sister lost her husband and every single one of her children so she's alone. that one just -- that was extraordinarily -- how can you live and lose everyone that you love? how can you? is this post-traumatic stress? will you sleep? will you not have nightmares? will you not? because we all have memories, and we can -- we have good and bad ones. we can put them away. can you put this away? can a soldier put this memory away? no. >> host: in your research, you write about different organizations and the people who found them like the soldier's project. explain what that is. >> host: she's an amazing woman. she's in her 70s. she went to see a play written by a soldier about combat, and she was struck. she was thinking i got to do something about this. someone in the audience asked her is your son a soldier? she said, they're all my children. that just c
happened and she went to jordan to help the librarians in the museums. brought over two young iraqis to get a ph.d. i had one for dinner. fala, who i'm very fond of. and as in arab culture whenever he comes over he brings me a gift and puts his hand over his heart. and he told me, that his sister lost her husband and every single one of her children. so she's alone. that was just, that was extraordinarily, how can you live and lose everyone that you love. . . written by a soldier about combat and she was struck. she was thinking, i've got to do something about this. and someone in the audience asked her, is your son a soldier? she said there are no children. that just came out of her. scioscia started an extraordinary project. she was a psychiatrist. her has been set at injury tire? why did she retire? so what she's done is there a psychiatrist all of the country who get free counseling to every member of the family. and the other family members need counseling. and she has conferences. and in these conferences, she invites a psychiatrist. she invited a congressperson who is very interested
there are upheavals in places like jordan, bahrain or even saudi arabia. so i'm not sure we have the luxury of consistency. i think what both of them were saying was that the middle east is extraordinarily complex. governor romney said two interesting things i thought. one is that what the united states did in iraq and afghanistan cannot be a template for the future. thed idea we're going to continue to send hundreds of thousands of americans to remake other societies, that's clearly a nonstarter. and then he said -- i think his phrase was -- we can't kill ourselves out of this mess. there has to be something else dealing with extremism and the muslim and arab world other than simply traditional counterterrorism and drone attacks. there has to be something larger to try to encourage the evolution of these societies so essentially young men don't make the career choice of becoming terrorists. i think that's a big idea. it's easier to articulate than implement it but i think again to me it's a welcome add toyings to the debate. >> woodruff: what about those two points, nick burns and what did
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 112 (some duplicates have been removed)